Beef producers can take advantage of feeding drought-stressed corn silage but should use caution

It is no surprise that Wisconsin farmers are feeling the pinch with limited feed resources and rising feed costs. Many beef producers are considering using corn silage in their winter-feeding program. This can be a viable source of feed, but caution must be taken to avoid some possible complications arising from nitrates and mycotoxins from drought-stressed corn silage. Nitrate accumulates in the lower portion of the stressed corn plant and is converted into nitrite in the rumen. Nitrite then affects the oxygen transporting capability of the animal, causing asphyxiation (suffocation). Corn stressed during ear development and pollination is also susceptible to mold and mycotoxin development. Mycotoxins can cause reduced feed intake, diarrhea, abortions and weight loss.

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2012 Drought Mitigation Options: Haying or Grazing CRP Land

By Rhonda Gildersleeve, UW Extension State Grazing Specialist

Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) enrolled acres may be a potential source of supplemental hay or acres for grazing livestock which producers might consider utilizing to alleviate short forage supplies due to drought. Wisconsin FSA has released a factsheet that summarizes 2012 FSA guidelines for both managed and emergency haying and grazing of CRP lands to assist producers with decisions related to use of CRP forages.

For the rest of the article go to http://fyi.uwex.edu/grazres/2012/07/23/2012-drought-mitigation-options-haying-or-grazing-crp-land/. Follow this site for updates on grazing resources and research.

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More Opportunities for Hay & Grazing: WI DNR Opens Selected State Properties

The State of Wisconsin announced Monday that farmers can harvest hay from approximately 11,500 acres of selected state-owned lands. Farmers may also graze cattle on state-owned land, although they will be responsible for setting up temporary electric fencing and watering tanks to facilitate the grazing. There will be no fee assessed, but lands will be available on a first-come basis.

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2012 Drought Impact on 2013 Unclear at This Point

Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist Widespread drought conditions so far in 2012 are clearly a large contributor to the current weakness in the cattle complex. There are numerous reports of early marketings of feeder cattle and cow liquidation which leaves no doubt that the drought is impacting cattle inventories and […]

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Summer 2012 Drought Resources

As of July 3 southern Wisconsin had not been classified by the drought monitor as severe, but many are concerned as the forecast continues to not include rain.  For beef producers who have cattle on pasture this summer, several questions are being asked about how to manage during this drought.  We have collected a set […]

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Steer to Steak Workshop to be held in June

Few cattlemen have the chance to follow cattle once they leave the farm through the process of becoming beef. The Steer to Steak Workshop will be offered this June in Viroqua, WI to provide this unique opportunity to cattle producers.  The program is offered by the University of Wisconsin-Extension; Premier Meats, Inc.; and Wisconsin Beef […]

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Growth Implants for Beef Cattle Production

By Amy Radunz, UW Beef Extension Specialist Below is a presentation I gave recently regarding use of growth implants in beef cattle.  Many people requested a copy of the presentation, because it can be difficult to find a complete list of growth implants available.  This presentation contains a list of current products which I was […]

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Science vs. Fiction: Lean Finely Textured Beef

The past few weeks have been a firestorm of media attention on the controversy surrounding pink slime, a.k.a lean finely textured beef.  It is disappointing a two words strung together – pink + slime can have this much of an impact.  And the science behind the procedure and implications are not driving the reaction but […]

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