We teach, learn, lead and serve, connecting people with the University of Wisconsin, and engaging with them in transforming lives and communities.

Use Extra Care When Hauling Cattle in Hot Weather

Wisconsin’s soil types and weather patterns, which support the growth of a variety of forages, are ideal for raising cattle. We have two seasons (cold winter and hot summer) that do not support cattle very well, but in general, even those times are limited in the length of time during which cattle may struggle, with […]

Read More...

Good management can help beat the summer heat

Water is the most important nutrient an animal requires and consumes daily. Depending on weight, production stage, and environmental temperature, cattle require varying amounts of water. A University of Georgia publication suggests for cattle in 90 °F temperatures, a growing animal or a lactating cow needs two gallons of water per 100 pounds of body […]

Read More...

Reconsidering Warm Season Forages

Alfalfa is wonderful grazing plant.  It’s easy to establish, has great tonnage, good quality and grows well in hot, dry conditions. On the other hand, it’s not perfect. Alfalfa needs re-seeding which is costly and it needs to be mechanically harvested 3-4 times a year if not grazed.  In addition, our typical cool, wet May […]

Read More...

Managing Heat Stress in Cattle

The forecast for this weekend in highs in the 90’s with humidity to make the heat indexes likley in the 100’s. For feedlot cattle, hot temperature for 2 or 3 days plus warm nights mean increased risk for heat stress. With a chance for rain on Thursday, humidity will increase making it difficult for heavy […]

Read More...

Pricing Standing Hay App Now Available for iPhones & iPads

Just in time for first crop hay in 2018 the UW-Extension pricing standing hay app     is now available in both Android and IOS versions. iPhone and iPad users can find the free app at  https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/hay-pricing/id1381165835?mt=8 or search the App Store for “Hay Pricing”.  The IOS version also includes links to the latest edition of the Alfalfa […]

Read More...

Digital Dermatitis isn’t just a dairy herd problem

Digital dermatitis (DD), also known as hairy heel warts, was discovered in 1974 in Italy. The disease first popped up in US dairy herds in the 1980’s, and spread rapidly during the 1990’s as herds expanded. The co-mingling of multiple dairy herds into one barn or facility made a perfect scenario for DD to infect […]

Read More...

Feed-Out Programs Comparisons for Spring 2018

It is not uncommon for beef producers to raise the question on net profitability of different production approaches to feed out cattle to harvest weights.  Some of the comparisons that often come into question are beef breed vs Holstein steers, or grass fed versus grain fed. Recently Dr. Dan Schaefer – UW Animal Sciences Dept, […]

Read More...

Resources on Building Structures

The recent collapse of several agricultural buildings due to heavy snowloads is a wake up call regarding structural engineering for buildings. Dr. David Bohnhoff, PE, UW Biosystems Engineering, has authored the following two article/ factsheets that provide information on steps to take to help ensure building structures are correctly engineered to minimize the risk of […]

Read More...

Recent Heavy Snow and Building Roofs

Due to the recent heavy snowfall there is reason to have concern over heavy snow loads on farm buildings. There have been  reports of farm buildings going down in Wisconsin. In addition, many have concerns for buildings that still have significant amounts of snow on them especially if more snow falls before the current snow […]

Read More...

Body Condition Scoring is Key Management Tool

Body condition scoring continues to be an important and useful management tool for beef cow/calf producers.  Unfortunately it is often forgotten about.  The current method of evaluating body condition involves visually evaluating the animal, and assigning a body condition score (BCS) that reflects the animal’s current state of condition.  It can be used as a […]

Read More...