About Us: 2004 Symposium

Best Education Practices (BEPs) for Water Outreach Professionals:

Defining BEPs, Refining New Resources and Recommending Future Actions — Report and Proceedings

June 2-4, 2004

Hosted by the University of Wisconsin, Environmental Resources Center

Report and Proceedings

2004 Symposium Proceedings

For a sample, see the Table of Contents below

We convened the 2004 Symposium to build knowledge among natural resources agencies and professionals that the application of BEPs in outreach efforts is an effective tool for accomplishing water management objectives. This Report and Proceedings describes the Symposium and the lessons learned about best practices in water outreach and education.

A draft of the BEP Symposium Proceedings was first published online in December 2004. But the Symposium represented much more than a collection of papers. Participants contributed to thoughtful discussion, analysis, and recommendations about the role of education in water management. This final copy presents what we accomplished during the Symposium in, what we hope you will find, is a meaningful and useful way.

In 2004-05, we developed a Target Audience meta analysis process for the Water Outreach Education Project target audience literature search. We decided to apply that same method to identify and explore the strengths and gaps in the Symposium target audience information. We expect you will find that information (pp. 23–28) particularly interesting.

 


CONTENTS

NOTE: Please disregard the “wateroutreach” url on the inside cover. The new website for this content is fyi.uwex.edu/wateroutreach

Forward………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 1

Planning Committee……………………………………………………………………………………………… 3

Agenda……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5

Executive Summary………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7

I. Symposium Purpose and Process

II. Recommendations

Symposium Summary and Findings………………………………………………………………………… 13

I. Framing the Dialogue

Searching for New Ideas

An Overview of Outreach Education and Best Education Practices

Participant Activities

II. Presentation Analysis and Target Audience Recommendations

Recommendations by Audience

Recommendations by Theme

        III.  Identifying Gaps in Target Audience Research

Project Analysis of Gaps

Participant Analysis of Gaps and Recommendations

IV. Challenges for Future Action

Panel Presentations: Facilitating Community Action

Participants’ Advice

Education: A Key Component of Water Management Strategies

V. References

VI. Appendices………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 33

Appendix A: Essential Best Education Practices…………………………………………….. 35

Appendix B: Summary of Findings by Primary Target Audience……………………….. 39

Appendix C: Water Outreach Education Web Site Resources………………………….. 61

Appendix D: Recommendations Summarized by Target Audiences, Tables 7-15… 63

Appendix E: Recommendations Summarized by Outreach Themes, Tables 16-22..75

Appendix F: Plenary Activity – Promoting BEPs and Challenges for Future Action..87

Papers, Posters and Panels (Index)…………………………………………………………………………….. 99 – 102

Keynote Address: Kevin Coyle, Education – An Essential Ingredient for Successful Water Management……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 103

Featured Case Study Presentation (abstract): Andy Yencha and Kevan Klingberg, Making Our Nonpoint Source Pollution Education Programs Effective………………………………………………………109

Research Papers on Audience Specific BEPs (in alphabetical order by presenter) …………. 111

Elizabeth Bird (Alternate) Livestock EMS Pilots: Lessons about Education Strategies (Abstract)

Joe Bonnell and Anne Baird, Applying Principles of Adult Education Theory to a Professional Development Program for Watershed Group Leaders

Eleanor Burkett and Mary Blickenderfer, Shoreland Revegetation Workshops Promote Environmental Stewardship

Michael Dietz, Education and Changes in Residential Nonpoint Source Pollution

Patrick Edwards, Improving Aquatic Insect Identifications Made by Students and Volunteers

Richard Enfield and Richard Ponzio, From Dewey to Doing: How Experiential Education Theory Can Be Effectively Used as a Best Education Practice

Patricia Farrell, The Long and Short of Groundwater Education for Michigan Farmers

Anita Kraemer, Evaluation of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s Conservation Education Programs

Timothy Lawrence, Local Control of the Environment: Is This What They Asked For?

Jennifer Levin, From Theory to Practice: Best Practices in Boating, Fishing, and Aquatic Stewardship Education

Robert Mahler, Using a Survey Instrument to Determine Audience Preferred Delivery Methods for Water Quality in the Pacific Northwest

Michael Marzolla (Alternate), Agua Pura and Los Pescadores: Latino Youth and Families Engage in Water Resource Issues

LaDonna McCowan (Alternate), Drinking Water Education for Underserved Communities

Suzanna Roffe, Assessing Extension Program Impact: Case Study of a Water Quality Program

John Vickery, Application of Marketing Techniques to Extension Programming Decision Making: Minnesota Livestock Producers’ Preferred Topics, Informational Formats, and Outreach Methods Concerning Land Application of Manure

Poster Abstracts and Papers on Target Audience Education Practices and Measures of Success (in alphabetical order by presenter) ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 237

Mary Bianchi, Water Quality Education for Irrigated Agriculture on California’s Central Coast (Abstract)

James P. Dobrowolski , Activity-Based Learning and Daily Field Experiences Help Bring Watershed Restoration to Life (Abstract)

Les Everett, Timing and Design of Education Programs to Enhance Participation: Manure Management Education in Minnesota (Paper)

Taralyn Fisher, Montana Beef Environmental Management Systems Pilot Project (Abstract)

Thomas Green, Financial Safety Net for Corn Farmers: An Emerging Educational Tool to Increase Adoption of Nutrient BMPS (Abstract)

Cynthia Hagley, Duluth Streams (duluthstreams.org) – Making Water Quality, Land Use, and Stormwater Data Come Alive for Decision-Makers (Abstract)

Karen Hargrove, Catfish in the Mainstream: Social Marketing (Paper)

Mrill Ingram, Tailoring Pollution Prevention for Urban Landscapers in Madison, Wisconsin (Abstract)

Karen Janowitz, Water Resource Education for Real Estate Professionals in the South Puget Sound Region, Washington (Abstract)

Jerry Kauffman, SMARTYARDS and Other Watershed Outreach Programs of the Christina Basin Clean Water Partnership in Delaware, Maryland and Pennsylvania (Abstract)

Amber Langston, Fostering Locally-Led Holistic Watershed Management (Abstract)

Judy Maben, Water Leaders Class – Preparing for the Future (Abstract)

Tabitha Madzura, Web-Based Watershed Tools for the Classroom: A Pilot 319 Project for Grades 4-8 in Southwest and Northeast Missouri Watersheds (Paper)

Monica Lopez Magee, Team WET Schools: Building School-Community Partnerships to Promote Water Education and Stewardship among Underserved Urban Youth (Abstract)

Mike Mecke, “Water for West Texas” – A New Extension Program (Abstract)

Caitrin Noel, The University of Vermont Watershed Alliance: Using Youth Education and Service to Engage Communities in Local Water Quality (Abstract)

S.S. Parmar and Dalip K. Gosain, Watershed Development in Una District of Himachal Pradesh in India (Abstract)

Amy Rager, Best Practices for Environmental Field Days (Abstract)

Marcy Seavey, Teacher Perceptions of Iowa Workshop Model Aspects for Fostering Use of Project WET (Abstract)

Lori Severtson, How Does Risk Information Shape Protective Behavior and Support for Policy to Mitigate Risk in the Environment? (Abstract)

Lori Severtson, Evidence Supporting Yearly Community Well Testing (Abstract)

Lori Severtson, A Utilization-Focused and Theory-Based Evaluation of an Arsenic Well Testing Program (Paper)

George Smith, Enlisting Landowners in Water Conservation (Paper)

Ron Struss, Minnesota Water – Let’s Keep It Clean: A Twin Cities Stormwater Education Collaboration (Abstract)

Scarlet Tang, Lake-Friendly Gardening: Case Study in Homeowner Education in Whatcom County, Washington (Abstract)

Eileen Tramontana, Leaving a Legacy (Paper)

Andreé Walker, Stream Side Science – Developing Outreach Materials with the Audience in Mind (Abstract)

Clint Waltz, A Blended Learning Program for Golf Course Water Conservation (Paper)

Panel Presentations (PowerPoint slides)

Framing the Dialogue – BEP Target Audience Success Stories……………………………………… 305

Rachael Herpel, The Groundwater Foundation

Diane Cantrell, Professional Development for Natural Resource Professionals

Water Policy Decision Makers’ Needs

Jack Wilbur, Getting in Step: A Guide to Effective Outreach in Your Watershed (Web site presentation)

Promotion and Communication – Moving Water Outreach and Education from Backwater to Mainstream…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 325

Derek Godwin, OSU Extension’s Master Watershed Steward Program

Barb Liukkonen, NEMO Northland: Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials

Robert Mahler, Regional Outreach Program Design

Kris Stepenuck, Partnering with Extension for Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring

Closing Address: Cornelia Butler Flora, Education – Is It an Essential Ingredient for Community-Based Water Management?………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 339

Participants……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 345


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A USDA/CSREES National Water Program
National Facilitation Project

The BEP Symposium, and the National Extension Water Outreach Education Web site and resources, are based upon work by the University of Wisconsin, Environmental Resources Center, with support from the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES), U.S. Department of Agriculture, under Agreement No. 00-51130-9714. It is a collaboration of CSREES and other public and private clean and safe water partners to promote best education practices for water education and to improve access to education resources and strategies.