Staying safe on the farm

Cheryl Skjolaas, Extension Agricultural Safety Specialist
Department of Biological Systems Engineering
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
608-262-0568
skjolaas@wisc.edu

Total time – 3:03

0:11 – What is National Farm Safety Week
0:32 – When is National Farm Safety Week
0:42 – Occupational hazards of farming
1:31 – Safety tips
2:19 – Where to find more safety tips
2:28 – Tips for farmers well-being
2:54 – Lead out

 

TRANSCRIPT

Lorre Kolb: Recognizing the hazards in farming. We’re visiting today with Cheryl Skjolaas with the Center for Ag Safety and Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Lorre Kolb. Cheryl what is National Farm Safety Week?

Cheryl Skjolaas: National Farm Safety Week is a week dedicated to different topics related to agricultural safety and a chance, as we move into the harvest season, to highlight and focus in on some of those key safety considerations to help everybody have a safe harvest.

Lorre Kolb: And when is National Farm Safety Week?

Cheryl Skjolaas: National Farm Safety Week this year is September 16th through the 22nd.

Lorre Kolb: Can you talk about some of the occupational hazards of farming?

Cheryl Skjolaas: There are a lot of different occupational hazards within farming because we cover such a diverse type of agriculture and especially here in Wisconsin as we will not only be harvesting corn and soybeans, we still have some alfalfa that might be taken as a fourth crop;  we’re going to be having cranberries and potatoes, but will all of that, some of the common factors is that we’re using machines, we’re using tractors, we’re taking some of those product as feed for livestock and within each of those systems are different types of risk – from machinery entanglements to falls off of equipment to operating that equipment at all times of the day and night because we have weather that we have to deal with.

Lorre Kolb: And what are some safety types for farming and being around farms?

Cheryl Skjolaas: One is to really do a good job with the maintenance of your equipment; it prevents that breakdown in the field. Also remember to check your lighting and your marking if you’re going out on the road. Be sure that you have the right required lighting and marking. The second thing is if an incident happens, take that breath before you dive into the situation – lock it out by taking that getting that power off being sure that any residual power is out of there. The other factor is cover what equipment you’re operating with your family, with any employees. Be sure jobs are age appropriate and the people have the proper training on that equipment that they’re operating.

Lorre Kolb: Where can people find more safety tips?

Cheryl Skjolaas: You can go to fyi.uwex.edu/agsafety

Lorre Kolb: What are some tips for taking care of the human factors?

Cheryl Skjolaas: The harvest season can be really stressful. Take breaks, give yourself a rest from that equipment that you’re operating. Eat well so that your body has that nutrition to keep it going throughout the day. Get good sleep, know to take that break from the day. Also, be sure to spend that time with family. Be sure that you’re in the best shape throughout the season.

Lorre Kolb: We’ve been visiting today with Cheryl Skjolaas with the Center for Ag Safety and Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Lorre Kolb.

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