Variability of Bypass Protein in Forages

Variability of Bypass Protein in Forages by Patrick C. Hoffman and Nancy M. BrehmDepartment of Dairy ScienceUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison Introduction Until recently there have been no commercially viable tests to evaluate bypass protein content of forages. As a result, nutrition consultants and producers have estimated the bypass protein content of forages to formulate rations. The principal source of […]

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Relative Forage Quality (RFQ) – Indexing Legumes and Grasses for Forage Quality

Relative Forage Quality (RFQ) Indexing Legumes and Grasses for Forage Quality by Dan Undersander, University of Wisconsin and John E. Moore, University of Florida Relative Feed Value has been of great value in ranking forages for sale or inventorying and assigning forage to animal groups according to their quality needs. With the introduction of the new approaches to determining […]

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Diurnal Variation in Forage Quality Affects Animal Preference and Production

Diurnal Variation in Forage Quality Affects AnimalPreference and Production H.F. Mayland, USDA-ARS, 3793 N 3600 E, Kimberly, ID 83341email: mayland@kimberly.ars.pn.usbr.gov  phone: 208-423-6517G.E. Shewmaker, Univ. Idaho, Twin Falls, ID 83303-1827D.S. Fisher, USDA-ARS, Watkinsville, GA 30677-2373, andJ.C. Burns, USDA-ARS, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620 Introduction In 1993, we began to evaluate animal grazing preferences among eight tall fescue cultivars, including HiMag which had […]

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Estimation of Alfalfa NDF Using PEAQ with a Simplified Staging Scale

Estimation of Alfalfa NDF Using PEAQ with a Simplified Staging Scale Step 1: Choose a representative 2-square-foot area in the field.  Step 2: Determine the most mature stem in the 2-square-foot sampling area using the criteria shown in the table at right.  Step 3: Measure the length of the tallest stem in the 2-square-foot area. Measure it from […]

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Getting Low Potassium in Forages

Getting Low Potassium in Forages by Dan Undersander and Keith Kelling, University of Wisconsin Hypocalcemia results from a deficiency in plasma Calcium at the onset of lactation in dairy cows, and is the main cause of several severe metabolic disorders. Three weeks prior to calving, it is desirable to have a moderately anionic diet, to avoid milk fever and […]

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Prevent Hay Mow and Silo Fires

Prevent Hay Mow and Silo Fires by R.L. Tormoehlem, R.G. Koegel, H.D. Bruhn and D.V. Jensen Numerous barn and silo fires occur annually in Wisconsin.  Barn fires, usually caused by spontaneous ignition of hay, occur during and after the haying season. Silage may spontaneously ignite when it is ensiled at less than 40 percent moisture.  Barn and silo […]

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Digestion Kinetics of Forages

Digestion Kinetics of Forages by D.K. Combs1, E.P. Beyer-Neumann1,2, M.T. Rodriques, D.J. Undersander2 and P.C. Hoffman1Departments of Dairy Science1 and Agronomy2 University of Wisconsin-Madison As cattle are fed for higher levels of production it becomes more important to define nutrient requirements in increasingly sophisticated terms. The National Research Council (NRC, 1989) has established requirements for NEL, and […]

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Milk2016 (ALFALFA-GRASS): Index Combining Yield and Quality

Milk2016 (ALFALFA-GRASS): Index Combining Yield and Quality by Dan Undersander2,3, D. Combs1,2, and J. R. Shaver1,3 Department of Dairy Science1 and Agronomy2 University of Wisconsin-Madison University of Wisconsin-Extension3 Introduction Undersander et al. (1993) developed a method for estimating milk per ton of forage dry matter (DM) as an index of forage quality of alfalfa and grasses. […]

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Improving Forage and TMR Bunk Life

Improving Forage and TMR Bunk Life by Jim Leverich and Randy Shaver Introduction Forages and total mix rations (TMRs) that begin heating after they are fed can lower dry matter intake and animal performance. Proper management during ensiling and feeding can minimize heating in the feed bunk and improve palatability. What causes feed to heat in a bunk? […]

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