Federal Procurement: A $9.5 billion business in WIsconsin

In 2009, federal procurement contracts (the purchase of goods and services by the federal government) totaled $551 billion. Wisconsin’s share was $9.5 billion, ranking 17th among the fifty states and 16th on a per capita basis. For comparison, Minnesota businesses were awarded $4.8 billion in federal contracts in 2009. To provide some context, travelers spent […]

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Getting our share of federal funds?

According to the Consolidated Federal Funds Report for Fiscal Year 2009 , the federal government spent $3.2 trillion dollars in 2009. California received the most federal dollars ($346 billion). Wyoming received the least ($6.3 billion). In 2009, the federal government spent $61 billion in Wisconsin. $3.2 trillion equates to $10,548 per capita. Alaska ranked first […]

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Per capita income

Per capita income (PCI) = (total personal income ÷ total population) In 2009, only five Wisconsin counties (Ozaukee, Waukesha, Dane, Door, and Columbia) had per capita incomes (PCI) higher that the U.S. average of $39,595. The PCI in sixty-seven Wisconsin counties was lower than the national average. In some counties the difference was relatively small […]

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Didn’t we win the Superbowl?

Wisconsin’s lower than average per capita income (PCI)* is one of the most frequently cited economic metrics. We are often reminded that Wisconsin’s PCI is below the national, Minnesota and Illinois PCIs. What is often not mentioned is that Wisconsin’s PCI is above that of twenty-two states including Michigan, Indiana, and Iowa. *PCI is calculated […]

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What’s driving Wisconsin’s economic recovery?

According to the most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, private sector employment in Wisconsin grew by 25,000 (about 1 percent) in the last year. Historically, manufacturing has been a primary driver of the Wisconsin economy. Even after the significant recent job losses in manufacturing, this important sector still provides almost one in […]

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