New Fact Sheet on Gastrointestinal Parasite Management in Cattle Available from UW Extension

As the seasons change from winter to spring, a grazer’s thoughts turn to fencing repairs and pasture renovations. It’s also time when astute managers who graze cattle plan their deworming strategies. Gastrointestinal parasitic worms (including Ostertagia, Cooperia and Haemonchus) also sense the season’s change. They gear up their reproductive efforts during the event commonly known […]

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Use Laboratory Diagnosis to Determine Deworming Strategies

Wisconsin’s 2016 growing season was ‘good for grass’, as abundant rainfall and optimal temperatures supported forage production. For certain, internal parasites whose life cycle depends upon grass and grazing ruminants, proliferated in response to all that grass. Efficacy of the most commonly used dewormers today is 59%, and history shows efficacy decreasing every year. Bottom […]

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Understanding the Effects of Cold Stress on Beef Cattle

Most beef producers understand that when the weather gets colder their cows need more energy to maintain their body condition.  The questions are when do cows start experiencing cold stress and then how much more energy do they need? When we’re considering cold stress, we need to factor in both the actual temperature and the […]

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Sorghum and Sorghum-sudangrass and Frost

There has been an increase in the number of acres of forage sorghum and sorghum-sudangrass planted in Wisconsin this past year due to the long winter, late wet spring, drought last year and  some areas of the state having a lot of alfalfa winter kill. The recent frosts can create prussic acid problems with these […]

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Feedlot Pen Maintenance Allows Cattle to Walk Easier

Written by Roger Ellis, DVM, South Dakota State University Extension Feedlot Field Specialist, used with permissison, origninally appears at SDSU iGrow website. This spring and summer’s wet weather is likely creating problems for some Wisconsin Cattle Feeders and their animals too. Beef feedlot operations are faced with daily tasks of managing feed and cattle inventory, […]

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Receiving health program critical for cattle purchased at the sale barn

A survey of a Wisconsin livestock market in 2002 indicated only 7.5% of the cattle were announced as being vaccinated and boostered for bovine respiratory diesease at the surveyed feeder calf sales. Typically, the health, management, and vaccination history for the majority of feeder calves sold at sale barns are not known to the buyer. At a sale barn, cattle are commingled with other cattle exposing them to diseases coupled with the stress of this experience, these calves are at a higher health risk when they arrive to their new home then cattle directly transported to the farm. According to the 2002 Wisconsin livestock market survey, calves not castrated, vaccinated, or dehorned resulted in a $12/cwt discount. Some may view the strategy of purchasing these discounted cattle as money saving, but sometimes a little money saved in the beginning results in more money lost in the end. However, if a farmer is inclined to buy discounted cattle, which may need some additional care, here are some guidelines that should help reduce chances of having a wreck.

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Are your vaccines and health products working?

The failure of animal products and vaccines often are the result of human error and not the result of a defective product.

Have you ever done any of the following things?

Stored product in an old refrigerator out in the shed.
Buy the product at the store, throw the bag in the truck, make a few stops, and then put the product in the refrigerator when you get home.
Vaccinated cattle into the middle day where vaccine was exposed to sunlight and warm temperatures.
Bought too much product, only used half a bottle, and saved for next time.
Used expired product.
All of these practices could result in reducing the effectiveness of these products. Most farmers most likely could say yes to one of things. In order for the health products to be successful, proper handling and storage of these products is critical.

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