No-till planting on heavy soils

Jason Cavadini, Agronomistm00183art03
Marshfield Agricultural Research Station
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
jason.cavadini@wisc.edu
Phone (715) 687-4624, (715) 650-7451

 

Jason Cavadini discusses the no-till research being done in central Wisconsin and the benefit no-till has on soils in this weeks audio.

3:06 – Total Time

0:16 – Put away the plows
0:41 – What no-till is
0:58 – Money savings
1:25 – Better soil health
2:12 – Central Wisconsin farmers learning fast
2:57: Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: Put away those plows, we’re visiting today with Jason Cavadini, Marshfield Agricultural Research Station University of Wisconsin-Madison in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Jason, tell us how people can put away their plows?

Jason Cavadini: We have been experimenting with no-till planting here for the last two growing seasons now. This year we are at about eighty percent of our acres we planted no-till. Started out with primarily corn, and now we are doing corn, soybeans, alfalfa, wheat, almost all of our crops we are doing some acres of no-till.

Sevie Kenyon: Jason, I’m going to ask you to explain to us what no-till is.

Jason Cavadini: No-till planting simply is planting a crop without doing primary tillage which, sometime three passes of tillage before planting operations.

Sevie Kenyon: And Jason what are some of the potential advantages of this no-till system?

Jason Cavadini: One of the main ones is the cost; less trips across the field with equipment so less fuel used. Also equipment savings, that’s basically the financial side of it but there’s also the whole soil productivity side of things.

Sevie Kenyon: Jason, go ahead and give us kind of a list of the things you like about the no-till system.

Jason Cavadini: The long-term no-till soil that is firm at the surface but takes in water readily is what we are really trying to achieve here. What we see is that farmers, have, for years have been fighting the soil trying to make it do what they want it to do. Here in central Wisconsin it’s what do we do with the water, how do we get it to move off of the surface, how do we get it to drain better. If through no-till we can allow the soil what it really wants to do, in our opinion that’s the best way of doing it. So if we can achieve a soil that’s going to readily take in water we think that will solve a lot of the challenges that we face here every year.

Sevie Kenyon: Jason tell us a little bit about how you’re working with the farmers here in this area.

Jason Cavadini: We have started a group what we’re calling, Central Wisconsin No-Tillers. A year ago we had a planter that we were setting up here on the station with different combinations of no-till tools. We’re trying to determine what the best set up is for our soils here. We decided to invite farmers after we’re finished planting in the spring to tell them what we found with our research planter. About ten farmers showed up but it was a very productive meeting and we tried to address things that they were questioning and we did the same thing again and forty-six farmers showed up and I guess every time we find out about something that has worked for a farmer we all celebrate that together.

Sevie Kenyon: We’ve been visiting today with Jason Cavadini, Marshfield Agricultural Research Station University of Wisconsin-Madison in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and I’m Sevie Kenyon.

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