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EXTending a hand in Dunn County

A new online program, eParenting® High Tech Kids, was created by UW-Extension educators to combat the negativity prevalent in conversations about youth and technology and, instead provide parents with positive uses and strategies for using digital media in their interactions with their 9- to 14-year-old children. The content is delivered to parents via school email lists and links them to an online blog.

The Dunn County News

 

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UW-Extension Offers Better Nutrition And Healthy Activity With Strong Women Program

Renee Koenig, the UW-Extension family living educator conducts Strong Women™ classes at various locations throughout Kewaunee county.  In the past year, she has instructed more than 60 women.  Many who attend her classes reported that they walked more, adopted a healthier diet and made a commitment to exercise.  Statewide, participants reported a variety of benefits as a result of Strong Women™, including increases in:

Door County Daily News

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Sarah Johnson

Pierce Food Pantry needs new digs

UW-Extension nutrition educator and Hunger Prevention Council of Pierce County coordinator Sarah Johnson said the HPCPC has started looking for a new space and is open to public suggestions.

Pierce County Herald

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Group explores possibilities for sanctuary on Lake Superior

“Yes, we’re looking for opportunity, growth and retention and attracting people here — but we think we’d have a lot to offer,” Mattson said, adding he didn’t want Iron County to be included in the project out of sympathy or as a charity case. “As you move forward, reach out to us and we’ll be happy to get involved in some of your planning processes.”

Will Andresen, with the county’s University of Wisconsin Extension Office, also pointed out a marine-sanctuary designation would likely help Iron County score higher on its recreation and tourism grant applications, in addition to being a tourism draw.

Your Daily Globe

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Mild Winter Could Cause Problems For Area Farmers

The mild and wet winter is making working on area farms difficult and confusing for the plants they grow.  Farms in Door and Kewaunee County have experienced over four inches of rain this month and temperatures well above average for December. Kewaunee County UW-Extension Agriculture Agent Aerica Bjurstrom says the biggest concern is for flowering plants like cherry and apple trees that could start to bud months earlier than usual.

Door County Daily News

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Patti Nagai

The Root of it All: Winter Houseplant Care

I have many houseplants, and most are doing well, but I have a spider plant that gets brown tips on the leaves (mostly in winter.) It has lots of babies hanging down, and even the little ones get brown tips. Is there something in my water causing this? I have a deep well, and the water is not treated with any chlorine. — Theresa, Union Grove.

Houseplants are subjected to some pretty harsh conditions over the winter, and brown tips on many plants are common. Brown tips and edges don’t look pretty, but they are generally a cosmetic problem and don’t harm the overall plant health. Other plants that commonly get brown leaf tips include peace lily (Spathiphyllum sp.), Chinese evergreen (Aglaonema sp.), and all of the dracaenas. Interestingly enough, these are all in the top 10 air-cleaning tropical plants grown in homes, so it is great to keep these plants healthy and growing over the winter. Sometimes, increasing the humidity around your plants helps decrease browning. Sometimes, watering regularly and not allowing the plant to wilt reduces the incidence of browning. But sometimes, browning is all about water quality.

The Journal Times

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4-H Hall Of Fame inducts leaders

The University of Wisconsin-Extension 4-H Youth Development Program on Nov. 7 inducted 11 laureates into the Wisconsin 4-H Hall of Fame. Barron County’s Larry Jerome was one of the 2015 laureates, inducted with the second Hall of Fame class, after 100 individuals were inducted in 2014 to celebrate the Wisconsin 4-H Centennial.

Agri-View

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Think Big, Buy Local

Rob Burke is a Community Development Educator with the Door County UW-Extension office. He says economic models have shown that just a one percent increase in local purchases could help create 45 jobs and more than two million dollars in additional local sales. But more importantly, Burkey says people will find they enjoy supporting local business owners.

Door County Daily News

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Buege named to 4-H Hall of Fame

WISCONSIN DELLS, Wis. – Dennis Buege, long-time University of Wisconsin-Madison Extension meat specialist and faculty member, was inducted posthumously in November into the Wisconsin 4-H Hall of Fame, at the Wisconsin 4-H Hall of Fame celebration.

Agri-View

 

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Pigs resistant to PRRS developed

“We’re excited to see these genetics coming down the pipeline,” said Zen Miller, leader of the University of Wisconsin-Extension Swine Team. “But we can’t get too excited yet because they will take a while to get to pork producers. From the producer standpoint, these types of developments can be painfully slow.”

Agri-View

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Wisconsin farmers celebrate 2015

The National Ag Statistics Service says farmers easily recovered from a cold start to their growing season with a warm-and-wet summer, followed by a dry fall for harvesting.

U-W Extension agronomist Joe Lauer says the state’s corn crop is projected to be the second-largest on record with 505-million bushels, and the soybean crop could be the highest at 93-million.

WSAU

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Farms have bumper crops of corn, soybeans

Outagamie County UW-Extension ag agent Kevin Jarek says the state’s corn harvest is the second largest on record, and farmers harvested more soybeans than ever before. He says dry spring weather helped farmers get in the field at an ideal time for planting, and late summer heat helped them mature. Jarek says a little luck along the way really helped the soybean crop. He says insects that usually prey on the plants never showed up.

News Talk 1150 WHBY

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