Instructor Led Sessions

Upcoming Webinars:

1. Anaerobic Digestion Webinars: Finance & Technology, March 14, 2012

Click HERE for complete agenda

2. Bioenergy Fridays

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension and e-Extension are cooperating to provide monthly Web Seminars focusing in Bioenergy Related topics. The topics for January and February 2012 have been set. These are free web seminars are meant for professional development of Extension educators, consultants, and state agency personnel, yet they are also open to the public. Feel free to send this not on to anyone who may benefit. See how to connect below.

Get your coffee and learn about bioenergy issues on the last Friday of each month. At the end of each seminar will be a question and answer session. Seminars will also be recorded and archived at http://extension.org/ag+energy 

  • Friday January 27th 10:00 – 11:00 AM CST Ethanol Engines (irrigation case study)

Spark ignition engines running 98% ethanol are increasing in number to run irrigation pumps in rural Nebraska. The industrial ag products center at UNL has tested these engines and will give an update about their performance and application.

  • Friday February 24th 10:00 – 11:00 AM CST Modern Solar PV Technology

New solar technologies have increased efficiencies while at the same time reduced costs. The seminar will cover existing and future solar PV tech.

How To Connect:

  • Start connecting 5 minutes prior to the start time. You need a computer with Internet access and speakers. At the meeting time, copy and paste this URL into your browser to enter the meeting: https://connect.extension.iastate.edu/agenergy/
  • At that URL you will find a login page. “Enter as a Guest” with your name, and business or institution and click “Enter Room.” The audio portion of the meeting will be come through your computer speakers.
  • Anytime before the meeting you can visit the following URL to confirm your ability to connect: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/testconnect/

3. Cellulosic Biofuels Web Seminar Series 2010—Seminar 6
*Presentations are archived at http://www.extension.org/pages/26874/farm-energy-webcast-series

  • Cellulosic Biofuels Web Seminar Series 2010
    State of the Industry: Corn and Cellulosic Ethanol *
    March 26, 2010. Presenter: Todd Sneller, Nebraska Ethanol Board
  • Economics of Cellulosic Biofuels *
    April 30, 2010. Presenter: Dr. Robert Wisner – Iowa State University (retired)
  • Cellulosic Biofuel Logistics*
    May 28, 2010. Presenter: Dr. John Cundiff, Virginia Tech University; discussion of issues associated with biomass production and deliver
  • Agronomic Impacts of Cellulosic Material Harvest *
    Corn Stover Feedstock Logistics
    June 25, 2010. Presenter: Dr. Greg Roth, Penn State University
  • Regional Feedstock Supply Opportunity
    June 25, 2010. Presenter: Bob McGrath, FSA; study with Imperial, NE, Young Farmers & Ranchers
  • Contracting Matters: A Discussion of Key Legal Considerations in Biomass Production, Harvesting, and Storage Contracts*
    September 24, 2010. Joe R. Thompson, Stoel Rives LLP
  • Real Green from Real Green
    October 29, 2010. Steve Flick, Show Me Energy

Video Topics:

The following video series comes from Bill Sciarappa, Agriculture & Resource Management Agent from Rutgers University. Bill is working to develop on-line outreach materials in bioenergy as part of a SUN grant from Cornell/DOT. The videos below are part of over 100 hours of expert presentations on various agriculture and bioenergy topics.

Videos will play automatically, and you can download additional video player instructions HERE.

For further information, contact Bill at sciarappa@njaes.rutgers.edu.

1. Bioenergy Research, Teaching, and Outreach

2. Challenges & Opportunities for On-Farm Bioenergy Production

3. Costs & Returns for the Production of Warm Season Grasses for Direct Combustion

4. Experiences with Biomass Energy

5. Overview of Incentive Programs

6. Switchgrass & Miscanthus Studies

7. Perspectives on Biofuels Development

8. Life Cycle Analysis and Indirect Land Use